Flattening the Top of the Ambidextrous Grizz-ubo Workbench

Just a quick post.  I decided not to go into great depth on how to flatten a benchtop as it has been explained before and better elsewhere.  But I did want to at least show this stage of my build here.

When I glued up the douglas fir portion of the benchtop, (before I added the sapele edges) I performed an initial flattening of the top.  I knew the top was pretty flat already at this point and wouldn’t take much to finish it off.

To start, I got out my jointer planes (Stanley Nos. 7 & 8).  I took diagonal passes all the way along the bench.

I started by taking diagonal passes across the bench at a 45-degree angle.

I started by taking diagonal passes across the bench at a 45° angle.

The jointer planes left marks that were easily visible.

You can see the marks left by the plane even from this distance.

You can see the marks left by the plane even from this distance.

After the first series of passes, I switched directions and planed along the bench on the reciprocal 45° angle.  Once this was done, I took a series of passes along the length of the bench with a slightly lighter set plane.

I took passes on the opposing 45 degree angle and followed that with straight shavings lengthwise down the bench.

I took passes on the opposing 45° angle and followed that with straight shavings lengthwise down the bench.

There were quite a few plane track marks that had to be cleaned up, and I did this with a smoothing plane.

After the jointer plane, I cleaned up the benchtop with a smoothing plane.

After the jointer plane, I cleaned up the benchtop with a smoothing plane.

I guess that I should point out that I checked the bench throughout this process with a pair of winding sticks, but I never found any twist, either before or after the flattening.  I also used a steel straight edge to check the benchtop was flat and was happy with the result.

Wow, what a workout!  I was well and truly smoked by the time I got done with this… and my arms felt a little rubbery for a while.  I also filled the wood stove a few times getting rid of all the shavings.  Not as if I needed the extra heat in the shop after that planing session.  Next up, sliding dead-men.

More soon.

 

– Jonathan White

About Jonathan

I am a woodworker and hand tool restorer / collector. I buy too many tools and don't build enough - I need help!
This entry was posted in The Grizz-ubo Bench and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Flattening the Top of the Ambidextrous Grizz-ubo Workbench

  1. Pingback: Applying Finish to the Workbench Top | The Bench Blog

I'd love to hear your thoughts, comments, or questions.