A Lucky Score At My Local Flea Market

Like I need another project.  My to-do list is already grown out of all sense of proportion to my available time, but….  I just couldn’t pass this up.

My daughter and I like to go to our local flea market that is held every other week in the summer months.  We usually have a poke around and come away without much, but it is fun, and I enjoy having something that just the two of us do together.

This weekend, as we were poking around, I found a guy selling some old tools laid out on the ground on blue tarps.  Most were the usual rusty chisels that had been sharpened down to a nub, but a jack plane with a Bed Rock lever cap caught my eye.

Three planes that I found at the flea market this weekend.

Three planes that I found at the flea market this weekend.

A little further looking through his offers led me to a wooden box with some other goodies inside.  I reached in and pulled out what I thought was going to be a No. 5 ¼, when I discovered that it was in fact a No. 10 Carriage Maker’s Rabbet Plane.  This plane is also often referred to as a Jack Rabbet Plane.  I have wanted one of these for years, but they command a hefty premium on eBay, and so I’ve never bought one.  Jackpot!

Looking into the box once more I saw a Bed Rock 606C.  I couldn’t believe it.  In all the years I’ve been rust hunting, I’ve never found a Bed Rock, and here I was finding two and a Rabbet plane.  Luck day.

Stanley No. 10 Carriage Plane. (Sometimes called a Jack Rabbit Plane)

Stanley No. 10 Carriage Plane. (Sometimes called a Jack Rabbit Plane)

To top it all off, the No. 10 has some remnants of orange paint on the sides of the frog.  I have written much about this in the past and you may remember that these are my favorite “Type” of plane.  The orange frog is a dead giveaway that the plane is a Type 15 manufactured in 1931-1932.  So finding a No. 10, and finding it in the Type that I would most desire if given the choice, was luck indeed.

Looks like I'll have to repair the tote.

Looks like I’ll have to repair the tote.

The Bed Rock 605 probably dates to about 1900-1912, though I need to do a closer examination to determine more accurately.  I haven’t taken the planes apart yet.  It has a small chip out of the casting near the toe, but it certainly won’t affect its use.

A Stanley Bed Rock 605.

A Stanley Bed Rock 605.

Of all the planes I’ve ever bought, this one might just have the best rosewood knob and tote that I’ve ever seen.

The rosewood on this one is particularly beautiful.

The rosewood on this one is particularly beautiful.

The 606C was the dirtiest of the three, but I think it will clean nicely.  I believe that this one dates between 1912-1922, but as I said, I need to do some further research when I take them apart.

A Stanley Bed Rock 606 (of a somewhat later vintage).

A Stanley Bed Rock 606C (of a somewhat later vintage).

The tote on this one is in good shape, but there appears to be a crack in the knob that I’ll have to address.

This one is pretty dirty, but it will clean up well.

This one is pretty dirty, but it will clean up well.

This one is corrugated.

This one is corrugated.

I’ve seen plenty of good planes for sale that I have walked away from.  I have so many that more wouldn’t really serve any useful point.  In fact, earlier the same day at another vendor, I passed on a No. 4 Type 14 that still had the remnants of the decal on the tote.  Yes, I could buy it, clean it, and flip it for sale, but If I keep buying planes, I’ll never get any woodworking done.  However, I really wanted the No. 10, and as the guy offered to give me a package deal,  I was able to by all three planes for way less that then No. 10 was worth alone.  His asking price was so low, I didn’t even haggle.

So now, I’m left with the question of what to do with them.

The No. 10 will get restored and go into my collection. As I said, I have long wanted one.

As to the 605, I have three completely restored Stanley No. 5’s and another that a friend gave me that I haven’t restored yet.  I could restore this plane, and then sell one of my other number 5’s, or I could give the 605 a quick clean and sell it.  I don’t really think I’ll need four Jack Planes.  I don’t really “need” the three I currently have.  I’ve heard the hype, but I wonder if the 605 is really that much better than a 5?

As to the 606C, the same applies.  I have a Stanley No. 6 and I love it.  Great plane.  Not sure I need two of them.   I wonder if this Bed Rock is truly better than my No. 6?

For now, I have put them under my bench and there they will sit for some time while I ponder and work on other things.  I’ve currently got too many other projects in the works to start on another restoration.

 

– Jonathan White

 

About Jonathan

I am a woodworker and hand tool restorer / collector. I buy too many tools and don't build enough - I need help!
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8 Responses to A Lucky Score At My Local Flea Market

  1. I think there is a flywheel effect to tools. Planes, auger bits, and saws seem to be the major players in my shop. I really need to unload some of the planes. Like you I have multiples. Two number 7’s seems excessive.
    My main influx of planes was a box of 20 that was too cheap to pass up. Common thread there……
    I think the main reason is after the first one of anything I look up information on it.. Then I am informed. That lets me judge value, kind of. I don’t really have experience, but I have someones opinion of what is valuable. That innoculation infects me with recognition of similar items. The rcognition feels good and we are off to the races.

    • Jonathan says:

      Hi David,

      I totally understand your “too cheap to pass up” comment. I got such a good deal on these that it wold have been silly to say no. Still, now I have another project on the list.

      All the best,

      Jonathan

  2. Eric Commarato says:

    Nice gets Jonathan!

  3. Gav says:

    I have a number 10 which I bought from a tool collectors stand which needed almost zero work to get it to perform. It wasn’t cheap but I see it as good value given the use it has had- a lot of it paid work. It has been invaluable for rebating/rabbeting. Nice find along with the others Jonathon. Occasionally stuff does fall in your lap! Know what you are saying with the rehabbing, time waits for no man and they do take time.

    • Jonathan says:

      Hey Gav,

      I’ve currently got the top half of my car engine on my workbench and would love to get back to some woodworking. Hopefully over this winter I’ll get them cleaned up.

      All the best,

      Jonathan

  4. Wow, You suck Jonathan 🙂 (common saying after a tool gloat, I have been known to hear that a few times 🙂

    Nice haul. I have yet to own a No 10 for the same reasons you mentioned, and have yet to come across one… yet

    These three should clean up nicely, up to your usual high standard. I would advise keeping both Bedrock for now, and start using them. There is a lot of hypes about Bedrocks and the recent craze about them fuelled up new offerings from Lie Nielsen, then Clifton, Woodcraft series and etc, etc. Don’t get me wrong, I love my little No 602, but frankly the differences between a properly set up Stanley Bailey type and a Bedrock is… You have to find out for yourself.

    The corrugated Bedrocks are worth more BTW.

    The only thing I like about corrugated soles is the fact that there are a lot faster to clean up 🙂

    Looking forward to their transformation

    Bob, who sucked a few times recently 🙂

    • Jonathan says:

      Hey Bob,

      I thought this post might grab your attention. 🙂

      You’re right about the corrugated soles being easier to clean up. I learned that one through experience a few years ago.

      I guess I will hang onto them for now and see if I can get to them this winter.

      All the best,

      Jonathan

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